“Statistics, Sports, and School,” Part 2: It’s a Go!…Now what ?

Earlier this year I posted about a new course proposal entitled “Stats, Sports, and School.”   My proposal was accepted!   This means that I will be preparing for this course until it launches August 2013.  

Now the Hard Work begins.

I want kids to be able to pursue their interests in constructing a statistical research project.  On the surface, their research topic should be tied (in some way)  to sports or sports medicine.

So I have some questions for you.  I’d love your comments: 

1.   Imagine you’re a student who’s just been dropped into this course.  What would you be interested in learning more about / researching in the sports/sports medicine field?

2.   Imagine you’re a student who’s just been dropped into this course.  What would you be interested in learning more about / researching in the area of statistics/data? 

3.  After you leave this course, what would you hope you have experienced. learned. or achieved?

Answer any of these or all of them.

Thanks.

About roughlynormal

I have been a math/statistics teacher for 20 years. I currently teach at a college prep school in southern California. I also coach teaching fellows for Math for America - Los Angeles chapter. I love my career, my colleagues, and my friends & family.
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4 Responses to “Statistics, Sports, and School,” Part 2: It’s a Go!…Now what ?

  1. I’m afraid my reaction would be “who locked me in the room with all these sports nuts? let me out! let me out, now!”

  2. Tim Erickson says:

    Congratulations! I have no suggestions right now, but I’ll keep this course in mind.

    Okay, here’s one for #3: I want to have experienced messing around with actual data—ideally collected by me—and finding out that I can say something intelligent about the surrounding topic as a result.

    At the end of that path, then, there is probably a presentation (written or video or whatever) where I’ve incorporated graphs, at a minimum, and more if that’s appropriate.

  3. Pingback: “Statistics, Sports and School:” getting ready, Part 1 | roughlynormal

  4. Jerry Tuttle says:

    Hi. “Imagine you’re a student … ” I’d like to know if performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) really work in a statistically significant way. As a quick example, Barry Bonds’ 73 home run season was way beyond 2 standard deviations from his 15 year mean home runs per season before that. Is that usually the case, or is the increase more gradual? I don’t know if data exists on when an athlete began using PEDs. By the way, it’s easy to find before and after pictures of Bonds – does every athlete on PEDs change so dramatically? Did Clemens?

    Jerry Tuttle
    onlinecollegemathteacher.blogspot.com

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